Absolutism and louis xiv

C N Trueman "Absolutism and France" historylearningsite. The History Learning Site, 17 Mar Absolutism or absolute monarchical rule was developing across Europe during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.

Absolutism and louis xiv

Visit Website Did you know? At the Palace of Versailles, aristocrats were expected to compete for the privilege of watching Louis XIV wake up, eat meals and prepare for bed.

French Absolutism: Louis XIV

Beginning intheir discontent erupted into a civil war known as the Fronde, which forced the royal family to flee Paris and instilled a lifelong fear of rebellion in the young king.

A diplomatic necessity more than anything else, the union produced six children, of whom only one, Louissurvived to adulthood.

Absolutism and louis xiv

He viewed himself as the direct representative of God, endowed with a divine right to wield the absolute power of the monarchy. Immediately after assuming control of the government, Louis worked tirelessly to centralize and tighten control of France and its overseas colonies.

His finance minister, Jean-Baptiste Colbertimplemented reforms that sharply reduced the deficit and fostered the growth of industry, while his war minister, the Marquis de Louvoisexpanded and reorganized the French army.

Louis also managed to pacify and disempower the historically rebellious nobles, who had fomented no less than 11 civil wars in four decades, by luring them to his court and habituating them to the opulent lifestyle there. Most famously, he transformed a royal hunting lodge in Versailles, a village 25 miles southwest of the capital, into one of the largest palaces in the world, officially moving his court and government there in It was against this awe-inspiring backdrop that Louis tamed the nobility and impressed foreign dignitaries, using entertainment, ceremony and a highly codified system of etiquette to assert his supremacy.

Under pressure from the English, Swedish and especially the Dutch, France retreated and returned the region to Spain, gaining only some frontier towns in Flanders. The ensuing war, fought on both hemispheres, lasted from to ; France emerged with most of its territory intact but its resources severely strained.

The long conflict plunged a famine-ridden France into massive debt, turning public opinion against the crown. Inthe devoutly Catholic king revoked the Edict of Nantes, issued by his grandfather Henry IV inwhich had granted freedom of worship and other rights to French Protestants known as Huguenots.

With the Edict of Fontainebleau, Louis ordered the destruction of Protestant churches, the closure of Protestant schools and the expulsion of Protestant clergy.

Protestants would be barred from assembling and their marriages would be deemed invalid. Baptism and education in the Catholic faith would be required of all children. Roughly 1 million Huguenots lived in France at the time, and many were artisans or other types of skilled workers.

Although emigration of Protestants was explicitly forbidden by the Edict of Fontainebleau, scores of people—estimates range fromto ,—fled in the decades that followed, settling in England, Switzerland, Germany and the American colonies, among other places.

His reign had lasted 72 years, longer than that of any other known European monarch, and left an indelible mark on the culture, history and destiny of France. His 5-year-old grandson succeeded him as Louis XV.Absolutism within France was a political system associated with kings such as Louis XIII and, more particularly, Louis XIV.

Absolutism or absolute monarchical r. Louis XIV was the culminating figure in the rise of French Absolutism. Kangxi vs. Louis XIV- Absolutism Absolute monarchy or absolutism means that the sovereign power or ultimate authority in the state rested in the hands of a king who claimed to rule by divine right.

Kangxi and Louis XIV were both shining examples for absolutist rule. Absolutism: The day after Cardinal Mazarin's death, Louis XIV, at the age of twenty three, expressed his determination to be a real king and the sole ruler of France: "Up to this moment I have been pleased to entrust the government of my affairs to the late Cardinal.

Louis XIV - the Sun King: Absolutism

It is now time that I govern them myself. Absolute monarchy is a historians who disagree with the appellation of absolutism argue that most monarchs labeled as absolutist exerted no greater power over their subjects than any other non-absolutist rulers, Power and Faction in Louis XIV's France.

Absolutism and louis xiv

New York: Blackwell Publishers, Miller, John (ed.). The Theory of Absolutism The day after Cardinal Mazarin's death, Louis XIV, at the age of twenty three, expressed his deterrnination to be a real king and the sole ruler of France: Louis proved willing to pay the price of being a strong ruler.

He established a consci entious routine from which he seldom deviated, but he did not look.

Absolutism and France - History Learning Site