Gobekli tepe writing a cover

Protestant Married Some perspective is required here. The excavation is still ongoing here, and the dates are from charcoal found on the site. This renders some problems, as often charcoal was collected from deadwood from natural fires - even more likely if we are looking at a Neolithic site, as they probably weren't making their own.

Gobekli tepe writing a cover

Dates from about the same period. Perhaps I will find a source with an archaeologist discovering the same Please explain the reason and based on what Wiki regulation this was done.

gobekli tepe writing a cover

Anyone else want to step up? There is nothing Armenian or Turkish. Any ethnic attachment is inappropriate. Turkey is only mentioned due to the physical location of the site.

Leave ethnic wrangling out. Neither of them meet WP: RS for this issue.

Göbekli Tepe and the Worst Day in History — Blog of the Long Now

Doug Weller talk Dear Sirs, in illimitable vastness of Wikipedia articles readers come across thousands of cases where modern geographical, personal or other names are provided with alternative versions they are known under by other ethnic groups or in earlier historical periods.

As just one example, Mount Ararat is given both in Turkish: So, I guess, my question is: What does this have to do with the mass extermination of the Armenians by the Turks or laying a foolish claim that it was the Armenians who built this Neolithic complex?

Sorry, but I see no point in this. There is also a Kurdish name of GT that I just found out and wished to add. Also, what Wiki rule or regulation determines whether an author of a published source is fringe or non-fringe? Instead, I was given certain User: Prohairesius, not even a Wiki editor, whose comment contains nothing remotely applicable to reasonable explanation.

Editors then brought up an archival comment, which says: How do you explain inclusion of many in the great number of your other articles and the removal of one in this article? You can read WP: Wikipedia is a mainstream encyclopedia, Doug Weller talk Thank you for providing a link to WP: Everyone who edits at all is an editor, be it a talk page or an article or any other page.

We call them users, and their talk pages are "User talk" - yours is [[User talk: Normally each article is considered on its own.

There you have a linguistic innovation BCE designed to lessen the sensitivity of a religious group. Here, if we accept that each article is considered on its own, we have a modern place name, which represents a direct translation of a more ancient Armenian toponym, and another one in the language of the Kurds Gire Navoke who, after Armenians were mass murdered, now inhabit the area.

Therefore, I think it is relevant to include both Armenian and Kurdish names for the site. Any historian will testify that the area was inhabited by the Armenians millennia before the Turks. Not as an analogy for this article, but only as food for thought.

However, both names co-exist in Wikipedia however sorrowful this might be for the Christians.

Archaeologists find 12,year-old pictograph at Gobeklitepe | Ancient Origins

What is such a big deal with GT? Gobekli Tepe refers to two things, a not very impressive mountain ridge, notable mainly for a single mulberry tree near the peak that Muslims used to maybe still do hang written prayers on. Since it also refers to an archaeological site discovered near the peak.

Portasar, I take it, is the Armenian name for the mountain ridge I forget the Kurdish name. If you want to start a page about the mountain ridge, and identify it as Portasar, please do. Although even that would be problematic, because I assume people near the mountain continue to refer to it as Gobekli Tepe, so to be fair you would need to add that name.

And the Kurds, or a couple of Kurds anyway who have edited this page in the past, would probably want their name for the mountain ridge to be added. This page, however is not about the mountain ridge. If we knew what the people who built the temene and the other buildings called the archaeological site originally, we might call it that, like Machu Picchu.

Unfortunately it was built way before writing was invented, so we have no way of knowing.The ruins of Göbekli Tepe. Photograph by Vincent J. Musi. IN , anthropologists from the University of Chicago and the University of Istanbul surveyed ruins atop of a hill in Southern Turkey that the locals called Göbekli Tepe (“potbelly hill” in Turkish).

Gobekli Tepe is a massive, ancient temple found in Turkey, built out of pillars organized into great stone rings.

gobekli tepe writing a cover

The pillars are decorated with intricate sculptures of lions, scorpions, and vultures, twisting around their sides, but they’re more than just beautiful works of art.

Gobekli Tepe: The World’s First Temple? Predating Stonehenge by 6, years, Turkey’s stunning Gobekli Tepe upends the conventional view of the rise of civilization Now seen as early evidence of prehistoric worship, the hilltop site was previously shunned by researchers as nothing more than a medieval cemetery.

Gobekli Tepe is a massive, ancient temple found in Turkey, built out of pillars organized into great stone rings. The pillars are decorated with intricate sculptures of lions, scorpions, and vultures, twisting around their sides, but they’re more than just beautiful works of art.

Gobekli Tepe was the physical “turning point” of our km drive around Turkey from/to Istanbul. In some respects it was also the major goal - and this in a journey during which we made our first visits to, inter alia, Hattushas, Nemrut Dag, Catlahayuk, Ephesus, Pergamon and Troy.

Feb 20,  · The World's Oldest Temple - Göbekli Tepe (Full Documentary). This is a seriously great documentary that's very interesting and fun to watch and part of a series of exciting and informative.

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